Author Topic: Flying Wild Alaska  (Read 9922 times)

Bradallen43

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Flying Wild Alaska
« on: February 04, 2011, 09:41:16 PM »
"Flying Wild Alaska" is on Discovery Channel right now. It's a fantastic show and is all about Era Alaska and how they cover the Bush in the Last Frontier.

Check it out.

arodsat

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2011, 12:19:49 AM »
Agreed. It's a great show and a great way to see how real bush pilots operate.

Dragnhorn

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2011, 12:33:46 AM »
My new "favorite" reality show.   lol
Rob Abernathy
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pivo11

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2011, 03:33:52 AM »

Ice Pilots airs Wednesdays on the History Channel in Canada.  That's another good one.  C-47's in the morning!  -40°F mornings, mind you.

Cheers,
Fritz 

One-Eye

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2011, 03:57:41 AM »

Ice Pilots airs Wednesdays on the History Channel in Canada.  That's another good one.  C-47's in the morning!  -40°F mornings, mind you.

Cheers,
Fritz 

Bu66er that for a game of soldiers! Mind you - I must admit that I know all about that. Many years ago I was in charge of an Army mobile workshop team supporting Brit Army Gazelles in Norway. These "pansy machines" were only rated to -36° C and the book sai that if temps dropped below, then the engines had to be run up to warm over and then the oil temp monitored and engines run again until ambient rose high enough.

Do you think that the pilots did that? Not on your nelly! Being of the right rank, I had my ground run permit signed so fast you couldn't say "Goodnight pilot". Mind you, I got plenty of experience ground running Gazelles at night during that three month spell. Not much sleep, but plenty of runtime...
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Check out my msfs 2020 videos on YouTube (Christopher Brisland)

AaronMyers

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2011, 11:41:38 AM »
I'm Tivo'ing it, but unfortunately seem to have missed episode number two. They seem to be replaying all but that one unless I want to buy it on Amazon.   :o
- Aaron

Wildbird

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2011, 06:29:49 PM »
Bu66er that for a game of soldiers! Mind you - I must admit that I know all about that. Many years ago I was in charge of an Army mobile workshop team supporting Brit Army Gazelles in Norway. These "pansy machines" were only rated to -36° C and the book sai that if temps dropped below, then the engines had to be run up to warm over and then the oil temp monitored and engines run again until ambient rose high enough.
Started to wonder for a sec there, had an encounter with several Gazelles while I was just a kid growing up in one of the coldest spots in Norway. They were French though, moving thru on some big NATO exercise. A mix of 20 Gazelles and Pumas is quite a sight for a young rotaryhead...

Hypo

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2011, 12:29:12 PM »
Great show, great planes:)


CAF440

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #8 on: February 12, 2011, 12:58:35 PM »

Ice Pilots airs Wednesdays on the History Channel in Canada.  That's another good one.  C-47's in the morning!  -40°F mornings, mind you.

Cheers,
Fritz

Ah yes the -40F of my RW home. Come late March comes the thaw finally, but no spring and a very short summer lol.

Magnum Beaver

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #9 on: February 12, 2011, 02:14:20 PM »
nice show, but better doing if for real.. flown on ERA many times when I lived up there.. Miss the old Convairs though..  and their DC-3 is truly a sight to behold (but never got a chance to ride in it myself).. Have also flown Penair and Iliamna Air Taxi..
If at first you don't succeed, then maybe skydiving isn't such a good idea!
Turboprop + Floats = Awesome Fishing!

Ross Aldrich
Payette, Idaho

spud

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2011, 09:39:07 AM »
Just caught the episode of mostly family flying, Jim and Ferno checking out some cabins. Family to some hot springs etc.  Some of the episode was about Ariel learning to fly.  I use that term in the loosest of meanings.  Right now she has only two things going for her.  !) She is the boss's daughter and 2) I think her instructor might have some designs on 'hittin that'.  When a student can not find the altimeter while flying an airplane its time to say "I have the airplane", go home and tell her she has a down on the flight and until she can pass a blindfold cockpit test do not think about flying anything.
(Blindfold Cockpit Test) Sit in the pilots seat wearing a blindfold and reach out and touch any instrument when its called out by the instructor.
I got a kick out of her mother's comment that she thought that a lot of times bad drivers make good pilots because Ariel's driving was terrible.  Sorry, the kid is just not ready to buckle down and learn basic ground school procedures it appears.
She is foxy though!  :-*
 8)

EDIT:  Yeah, I'm a Chauvinist, damn straight!  And she is foxy.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2011, 07:41:26 PM by spud »
Later,

Spud

Bradallen43

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2011, 01:56:12 PM »
Yeah and she almost killed the two of them twice!! First when she didn't correct on take off when she was letting the aircraft drift off the port side of the runway, then during stall practice, she went full left rudder when the aircraft stalled in that direction!! If it wasn't for her instructors quick reflexes to take over the aircraft, they would've been in a spin!

She's not looking too promising as far as becoming a good pilot right now. Maybe she'll buckle down and apply herself, but I wouldn't fly with her. No way!

Brad

Magnum Beaver

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #12 on: March 05, 2011, 03:06:48 PM »
Like most kids from well to do families she probably isn't taking it seriously, just assuming that she'll skate through... Either that, or she really doesn't have any interest in flying, and got put up to it for the show...  just my opinion, tho... I'm pretty cynical anymore...
If at first you don't succeed, then maybe skydiving isn't such a good idea!
Turboprop + Floats = Awesome Fishing!

Ross Aldrich
Payette, Idaho

AaronMyers

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2011, 01:17:15 AM »
She's an airhead... I wouldn't expect the training to go any other way frankly. Makes for some good entertainment though.
- Aaron

Leorstef

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Re: Flying Wild Alaska
« Reply #14 on: March 12, 2011, 10:38:10 AM »
She's an airhead... I wouldn't expect the training to go any other way frankly. Makes for some good entertainment though.

Yup.  Have to agree.
Here's her performance on a show called "Wipeout"...  ;D
(Bless her heart)